FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The GPS Origins™ Test
How do I take the test?
How does the GPS Origins™ test differ from other DNA ancestry tests?
What kind of technology does the GPS Origins™ ancestry test use?
How accurate is the GPS Origins™ test?
Can I increase the accuracy of GPS Origins™ DNA testing?
Can I use an existing DNA ancestry test? Do I need to take another one?
How can I use my DNA ancestry results? from another company?
What is a DNA raw data file? What do I do with it?
Will my GPS Origins™ DNA data file be available? How do I retrieve it?
Why did my DNA raw data file upload fail?
How long to upload my DNA raw data file into a report?
If I already have a DNA test why should I order the GPS Origins™ ancestry test?
About GPS Origins™
What is the GPS Origins™ ancestry DNA test?
How does the GPS Origins™ ancestry test work?
What does the GPS Origins™ test report include?
What is a Gene Pool?
What is a Reference Population?
GPS and your Family History
Will the GPS Origins™ ancestry test tell me where my ancestors originated?
How is that different from telling me who my ancestors are?
How will the GPS Origins™ ancestry DNA test help me with my family history?
Can I use my GPS Origins™ DNA test results to match with possible relatives?
What if my GPS Origins™ test report does not agree with my family history?
Why would my GPS Origins™ DNA test results be different than my siblings?
What if my family history indicates we have been in one area for a very long time and my results show I am connected to a dramatically different area?
I am mixed race. What will the GPS Origins™ DNA test results tell me?
I am adopted. Can the GPS Origins™ test help me discover my birth family?
What is the difference between my ethnicity and my genetic origin?
The GPS Origins™ Test
How do I take the test?
The GPS Origins™ ancestry test has a simple, three-step process:
  1. Order a DNA test kit online by creating your personal account.
  2. Upon receiving your kit, follow the instructions, take a swab sample from your inner cheek, and mail it to our secure lab in the prepaid return envelope.
  3. Log into your online account and read the full report. You will be notified when your test is available.
Get Started >
How does the GPS Origins™ test differ from other DNA ancestry tests?
Other ancestry DNA tests provide a limited ethnic composition at a regional or country level. For example, they might indicate 33% East Asian, 40% sub-Saharan African and 27% European.
GPS Origins™ goes beyond these broad ethnic classifications to identify your ancestral origins to a precise geographic location using an unprecedented number of gene pools and reference populations.
What kind of technology does the GPS Origins™ ancestry test use?
The GPS Origins™ test is an Autosomal DNA test, also known as a SNP (pronounced ‘snip’) test. It extracts markers from your Y-Chromosome DNA, X-Chromosome DNA and Mitochondrial DNA.
There are four types of DNA:
  • Y-DNA, which only occurs on the Y-chromosome, is passed down from father to son through the generations, and is only inherited by males.
  • X-DNA, which only occurs on the X-chromosome, is inherited by women from both parents, and by men from the mother.
  • Mitochondrial DNA (also known as mitochondria or mtDNA) is passed down through the maternal line, and is inherited by sons and daughters, but only passed on by females. It is the least changeable type of DNA, found outside the cell nucleus, not on a chromosome.
  • Autosomal DNA can be inherited from hundreds of thousands of your ancestors through the ages. Autosomal DNA can be found in 22 chromosomes, and provides 90% of your DNA.
The GPS Origins™ DNA test examines nearly 800,000 of your autosomal markers (SNPs) and compares them with the distinctive mutations in the gene pools of 862 reference populations. This pinpoints the places and times where your DNA last changed.
How accurate is the GPS Origins™ test?
The accuracy depends on your family history. If your parents are from the same place or two different locations, and not mixed themselves, the test can trace your DNA signature back to the country of origin 90% of the time. The test will predict the correct continent.
In a study of people from across the world GPS Origins™ algorithm predicted continental origins with 98% accuracy, assigned 83% of the individuals to their country of origin, and, where applicable, 66% of them to their regional locations.
If your ancestors were from Western Europe, and your parents came from the same region, not moving far from the place that they came from, the test will place your DNA signature within 50 miles of its true origin, and often closer.
Your results will show the origin as a point on a map. Any expected error appears as a circle around the point - the smaller the circle, the more accurate the result. The accuracy also depends on the size of the reference population in a given area; the larger the reference group, the more accurate the results will be.
Can I increase the accuracy of GPS Origins™ DNA testing?
The accuracy of GPS Origins™ correlates to the number of reference populations we use. Completing the survey below will help us increase the size of our reference database.
The GPS Origins™ DNA test works like a car’s satellite navigation system, using reference points to locate a position. If you add more reference points, the accuracy increases. In the same way, the GPS Origins™ algorithm will improve accuracy with more reference populations. Please participate in our questionnaire as your information will help us in this process. Your answers to the questionnaire will NOT affect your results.
Take Questionnaire >
Can I use an existing DNA ancestry test? Do I need to take another one?
It depends on the test you have already taken. You can upload results from 23andMe, Ancestry.com®, National Geographic™ Geno 2.0™, or the Family Tree DNA™ Family Finder; we can analyze them with our GPS Origins™ tool to provide the full report of where your DNA began. If your previous DNA test was a Y-chromosome test or Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) test, it is not compatible, and you will need to purchase the GPS Origins™ DNA test.
Get Started >
How can I use my DNA ancestry results? from another company?
Download your results from 23andMe, Ancestry.com®, National Geographic™ Geno 2.0™, or the Family Tree DNA™ Family Finder test by reviewing the instructions below:
Raw Data Downloads >
What is a DNA raw data file? What do I do with it?
Your DNA ancestry results include “raw data” that is provided from your DNA analysis. This information is only useful to an experienced scientist or genealogy program that can read the results and interpret the values. The “raw data” will look like a page of random numbers.
Will my GPS Origins™ DNA data file be available? How do I retrieve it?
Yes, your GPS Origins™ DNA data file is available to you because it is your data! Go to the Raw Data Download Instruction section of the FAQs to learn how to access your raw data file.
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Why did my DNA raw data file upload fail?
This may be the result of an insufficient amount of DNA data for the GPS Origins™ algorithm to calculate your report. We recommend going back to your original provider of the data and requesting a full data file.
How long to upload my DNA raw data file into a report?
It takes roughly 1 hour for your DNA raw data file to upload, run through the GPS Origins™ ancestry testing algorithm, and produce a report.
If I already have a DNA test why should I order the GPS Origins™ ancestry test?
While we accept results from other companies, we recommend using the GPS Origins™ DNA test because it tests 800,000 markers, one of the largest sets of DNA markers of all commercial ancestry DNA tests. The GPS Origins™ DNA test also includes many unique markers that cannot be found in other commercial tests and will be used in our future tests. You will not be able to take these future tests with raw data DNA test results provided by other companies. Additionally, if you upload raw data from another ancestry test, please understand that your GPS Origins™ results are dependent on the quality of their genotyping. Lower quality genotypes may affect your GPS Origins™ results.
About GPS Origins™
What is the GPS Origins™ ancestry DNA test?
The GPS (Geographic Population Structure) Origins™ DNA test allows you to trace your DNA ancestry back around 1000 years, or more, to the place where your DNA began.
GPS Origins™ uses 36 global gene pools to calculate the genetic signature of your autosomal DNA. For example: Fennoscandia 19%, Southern France 14%, Orkney Islands 20%, and so on. Next, it compares your unique DNA signature to populations all over the world (who we know have lived in the same location for a substantial period) to locate where your DNA began. In some cases, GPS Origins™ traces your DNA to the village or town level. Finally, it calculates two genetic lineages by tracing the migration routes of your DNA, using its ancient signature moving back through time.
How does the GPS Origins™ ancestry test work?
The test looks at the genetic composition of your DNA - your DNA signature - and compares it to a database of over 10,000 signatures from 862 populations with known geographic locations to identify the place where it began about 1,000 years ago.
We have identified 36 gene pools around the world. Each human population is made up of a mixture of these gene pools. In the distant past, individual migrations were rare. Genetic mixing tended to occur when large groups of people moved from one area to another, through invasion or mass migration. As the incoming gene pool mixed with the local one, a new genetic signature was created across the whole population.
The GPS Origins™ DNA test assumes that your DNA signature is unique to you but shares many characteristics with the populations or tribes from which it originated. By comparing your DNA to the signature mixes within different populations, GPS Origins™ can pinpoint the origin of your DNA.
The algorithm works out the differences, or genetic ‘distance’ between your DNA and the DNA population signatures in our database, and converts them to geographic distances. Then, like a car satellite navigation system, it uses the distances to calculate the coordinates of your DNA origin, which marks the spot where your DNA most recently changed at the population level. It occurs when two different populations came together and created your DNA signature.
Using a similar method GPS Origins™ then works backward to find two more points and plots the journey to where your DNA was mixed. It repeats this calculation for each element of your parental DNA.
What does the GPS Origins™ test report include?
Your report will present the geographical origins of your DNA, which could be a country or as close to the nearest town. Your DNA signature began when two different groups created a new genetic signature - the one that you ultimately inherited.
You will also see two migration routes - one for each side of your family - of your DNA back to where it came from, which may be over 10,000 years ago. Finally, the GPS Origins™ test dates the age of your DNA signature and determines when it last underwent a substantial change at the population level.
GPS Origins™ is a great tool to help you research your family tree!
What is a Gene Pool?
Also referred to as Ancestral Origin, a gene pool is the collective set of genetic information within a distinct population which does not breed with others from outside of the group. So far, 36 human gene pools around the world have been identified with each human population made up of a mixture of these gene pools. In the distant past genetic mixing tended to occur when large groups of people moved from one area to another, through invasion or mass migration. The GPS Origins™ test pinpoints the origin of your DNA by comparing it to the signature mixes in different populations.
What is a Reference Population
Also referred to as a Study Base, a reference population is a defined, representative sample of individuals during a specific time range used to establish norms for reference ranges. GPS Origins™ uses 862 reference populations in its database when calculating your results. This large number of reference populations, obtained from publicly referenced datasets, along with the 36 gene pools helps deliver the accuracy in your GPS Origins™ results.
GPS and your Family History
Will the GPS Origins™ test tell me where my ancestors originated?
GPS Origins™ ancestry test does not report the geographic origins of individual ancestors, but the geographical origin of your DNA. You can be certain that some of your ancestors came from these places within the period indicated.
How is that different from telling me who my ancestors are?
Assume that your four grandparents came from East Asia. Although they are four different individuals, their DNA signature is very similar, and the GPS Origins™ test would count that as one. In other words, when your ancestors stay in the same place and reuse the same genes it does not change the DNA signature; this is considered a single DNA signature and will infer its East Asian geographical origins.
How will the GPS Origins™ ancestry DNA test help me with my family history?
Discovering your genetic origin will help you answer the question of where you are from beyond the written record of your family history. It can help you open up further avenues of research and you can learn more about the lives of your ancestors at the point in history when your DNA began.
Your ‘ancestral family’ is much larger than your immediate family and you may be able to find out much more about their lives and culture with the GPS Origins™ test.
Because GPS Origins™ ancestry testing provides an accurate location, you can discover more about the place where your distant ancestors originated. GPS Origins™ will help you use historical and archaeological research to find out about the time and conditions in which your distant ancestors lived.
Can I use my GPS Origins™ DNA test results to match with possible relatives?
The GPS Origins™ test shows the origin of your DNA and those of users who choose to share it. These results are indicative of tribal DNA membership, but not necessarily direct familial relationships.
What if my GPS Origins™ test report does not agree with my family history?
In the case that one of your parents is of mixed origins because your grandparents are from two different places (e.g., England and Greece), GPS Origins™ migration lines for that parent would be traced along the middle migration paths of your grandparents (e.g., Hungary). This could be revealed via a larger circle (greater radius) around a stopping point, reflecting higher uncertainty in this area. GPS Origins™ is the story of your DNA, not necessarily of people. Your (and their) DNA may indeed have come from a region that no one remembers existed.
We are constantly developing improved tools that will give you more accurate and informative questions about your past, so stay tuned.
Why would my GPS Origins™ DNA test results be different than my siblings?
The GPS Origins™ test reports the results for two lineages (your parents) which may indicate your parental origins that were inherited from your maternal and paternal grandparents, and so on down the maternal and paternal line.
If your grandparents and parents are of mixed ancestry, GPS Origins™ identifies the most dominant origins, which may differ between siblings because they inherited different genetic material from each parent.
For example, imagine that your parents have hazel and brown eyes. You and your sibling(s) may have blue, hazel, or brown eyes because each one of you inherited a different trait from each parent.
So which sibling’s GPS Origins™ results are the most correct? They all are correct because each tells a story of different ancestral traits from your family. Despite coming from the same parents, the genetic traits of you and your sibling(s) may show the different path your ancestors have chosen. Combining sibling results together would yield your complete family story. The only siblings with the same result would be identical twins because they have identical DNA.
What if my family history indicates we have been in one area for a very long time and my results show I am connected to a dramatically different area?
All populations have intermixed genetically over time due to war, famine, general migration, and other events causing global population movement. As such, humans are not descended from a single gene pool, but have a mixture of genetic material and ancestral patterns.
For example, people may have ancestral ties to Western Europe but their ancestors could have been transported to that region as slaves hundreds of years ago. An example of the accuracy of this test can be demonstrated by a customer living in the U.S., whose family has been in North America for almost 100 years; however, her migration pattern stops near Falun, Sweden. This person informed us that her great grandmother was born in Falun, Sweden.
GPS Origins™ uncovers your ancient origins, which can go back hundreds to a few thousand years, whereas genealogical records cannot go back more than a few hundred years. There are likely surprising results in your report that may contradict your more recent ancestry.
I am mixed race. What will the GPS Origins™ DNA test results tell me?
The GPS Origins™ test always reports the results for two lineages, which should roughly correspond to the origin of your parents. The test works best for people with DNA from no more than two different places; that is to say, people whose parents are from different places but are not themselves mixed. For people with more mixing, say, four grandparents from various places across the globe, the test will report the midpoint between the four places.
The next generation of GPS Origins™ ancestry DNA testing will reveal the genetic origins for people with significantly mixed genetic backgrounds.
I am adopted. Can the GPS Origins™ test help me discover my birth family?
GPS Origins™ will tell you where your DNA is from and may help you get started on your search to find your birth family and to help you build a family tree.
What is the difference between my ethnicity and my genetic origin?
An ‘ethnic group’ is considered a group with shared characteristics such as culture, language, religion and traditions, and sees itself or is perceived by others as a distinct community. It is not necessarily genetic and definitions of what is a distinct ethnic group may vary from place to place.
The GPS Origins™ ancestry DNA test tells you where your DNA began. It is more accurate than your ethnicity, which refers to a much bigger group of people that may reside in multiple places. Genetic origin, therefore tells you much more about the smaller group of individuals who were your ancestors.
GPS Origins™ Ancestry DNA Test Results
How do I know my GPS Origins™ results are accurate?
The GPS Origins™ algorithm was developed at the University of Sheffield by the research team of Dr. Eran Elhaik who also developed the original GPS algorithm published in a peer-reviewed paper in the highly respected Nature communications journal (Elhaik et al. 2014. Nature communications). In that article, the authors showed that the GPS algorithm traced individuals back to their country, island, and the village of origins. The accuracy of the GPS Origins™ test was demonstrated by the DNA signature of ancient Ashkenazic Jews, formed some 1500-2000 years ago (Das et al. 2016. Genome Biology and Evolution).
Are my test results confidential or do you share results with others?
All test results are completely confidential. DDC® uses some of the most advanced security measures available for access, storage, and reporting. Unlike others, we do not share your results with anyone - only you choose to share your results.
Privacy Policy >
How to Order
What if my GPS location point is sitting over a body of water?
GPS Origins™ calculates positions according to your DNA, gene pools, and over 862 reference populations. Occasionally, your genetic location may reside over a pond or river, but don’t be alarmed, it doesn’t mean your DNA has originated in the water but rather that nowadays the river is running very close to the region where your DNA originated. Moreover, since our test establishes a location according to genetic proximity of your DNA and its similarities to various reference populations – you will also see a circle surrounding your data point, which represents a margin of error (or range) where your DNA may have formed.
What are the circles surrounding by my GPS location point on the map? Why do they differ in size?
The circle surrounding each data point represents a margin of error (or range).
What is included in the GPS Origins™ DNA test kit?
Your GPS Origins™ DNA test kit will include an order form, instruction manual, four (4) buccal (cheek) swabs, a DNA Sample envelope and a bar coded return envelope.
How do I order? Can I cancel my order? How long can I access my account?
You may order by going to GPSOrigins.com and selecting “Get Started”. You may cancel your order by contacting us before we receive your sample. However, once we receive your sample, processing and testing begins. Your account will be accessible until you notify us to remove it.
What's included in my test results report?
You will receive a detailed report of your DNA story. It starts with the Human Origin story from Africa- the origin of all humankind- starting 200,000 years ago. It is followed by a story of the formation of Gene Pools (Genetic Origins) some 50,000 years ago, with results showing which are most similar to your DNA. Next, you receive a map with two migration journeys, one from each side of the famiy, including their subsequent migration stories. The migration routes include ancestral points of your DNA – the last of which includes the period of its formation. Finally, you will receive a summary page with links to external research to help you learn more about your genetic origin.
When will I receive my results?
The GPS Origins™ test will take 4-6 weeks from the day we receive your DNA sample.
Get Started >
How do I change the email on my account? How do I reset my password?
Login to your GPS Origins™ account and click “Edit Account” in the gold column to the left. There you will find instructions for changing both your email and your password.
Can more than one person share an account?
Yes, but each report will only be accessible under one account. The customized GPS Origins™ report is unique to an individual's DNA data (Raw Data or DNA Test). You can set up multiple accounts for individual users.
When will GPS Origins™ be available outside the US or Canada?
The GPS Origins™ ancestry test is only sold in the US and Canada. The test will be provided outside the US and Canada in 2017.
About your genes
What is DNA?
DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is a long molecule that is in almost all of our cells in the nucleus. It is the DNA that contains the body’s unique genetic information or ‘blueprint’. The molecule is a helix that resembles a twisted ladder. The information in DNA, stored as a code, is made up of four nitrogenous chemicals or ‘bases’: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). It is the order of these bases in genes that determines the information for building and maintaining an organism.
DNA bases always pair up with each other in the same way: A with T and C with G, to form units called base pairs. Base pairs form the ‘rungs’ of the DNA ladder while the vertical supports are composed of nucleotides.
DNA can replicate itself and each strand of DNA in the double helix can serve as a pattern for a duplicate sequence of bases. Duplication critical when cells divide because each new cell needs to have an exact copy of the DNA in the old cell.
What is a chromosome?
Chromosomes are long DNA strands packaged into thread-like structures and located in the nucleus (core) of each cell. Each chromosome is made up of DNA tightly coiled around proteins called histones.
What are Genes?
A gene is a distinct sequence of DNA bases that forms the core unit of information that determines what characteristics every living creature has. Genes, inherited from both parents, are found on the chromosomes.
Every person has two copies of each gene, one inherited from each parent. Most genes are the same in all individuals, but a small number of genes vary slightly from person to person. These variations are what contribute to each person's unique physical features and tendencies. Your genes contain instructions for building everything about you: your eye, hair, and skin color, your tendency to gain weight, your athletic tendencies, your likelihood to develop addictions or diseases, and your other unique characteristics.
How is genetic information inherited?
Humans inherit 23 chromosomes from each of their parents. Sperm and eggs cells each contain 23 chromosomes, which combine during reproduction to give the offspring a total of 46. Forty-four of these chromosomes are identical in men and women - the autosomes. The remaining two are called sex chromosomes, and are designated X and Y. Women inherit two X chromosomes and men inherit one X-chromosome from their mother and one Y-chromosome from their father. The genetic information we inherit is never exactly the same as that of our parents. During the production of egg and sperm cells, the chromosomes exchange segments in a process known as recombination, which produces new combinations of genes. These gene combinations give us similarities to our mother and our father but are a new mosaic of our maternal and paternal genes.
What is a gene mutation?
Each gene is made up of a series of bases (a nitrogenous molecule), which provide instructions for making a single protein. Any change in the sequence of bases creates a change in the instructions - known as a mutation. Some mutations have little or no effect on the protein, while others may cause the protein not to function at all. A genetic mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence that makes up a gene.
Mutations can occur in many places in the genome and have various effects depending on where they happen. Hereditary Mutations,ones that pass from parent to child are present throughout a person's life in virtually every cell in the body.
Mutations that occur only in an egg or sperm cell, or just after fertilization, are called new (de novo) mutations and may explain genetic disorders in which an affected child has a mutation in every cell, but has no family history of the disorder. Acquired mutations occur in the DNA of individual cells at some time during a person's life. These changes are caused by environmental factors such as ultraviolet radiation from the sun.
Acquired mutations in cells that are not eggs or sperm cannot be passed on to the next generation. Some genetic changes are very rare while others are common. Genetic changes that occur in more than 1 percent of the population are called polymorphisms. They are common enough to be considered a normal variation in the DNA. Polymorphisms are responsible for many normal differences between people such as eye color, hair color, and blood type.
Raw Data Download Instructions
GPS Origins™ uses raw data from other companies to provide you with a unique GPS Origins™ ancestry report. Choose from the list below specific to the company you previously used.
Note: When downloading your data from Family Tree DNA™, 23andMe or National Geographic™ Geno 2.0™, AncestryDNA™, or GPS Origins™, save the raw data as a Zip file. Do not alter the file or change the file name.
Family Tree DNA™ Instructions
  1. Go to https://www.familytreedna.com
  2. Click “Sign In to myFTDNA” in the upper right-hand corner.
  3. Enter your username and password to access your account.
  4. Click “Download Raw Data” from the right side of the page.
  5. Review the privacy content provided.
  6. Examine the Raw Data options and choose “Build 37 Autosomal Raw Data”.
  7. Save the Zip file to your computer.
  8. Login to your GPS Origins™ account and click “Upload Raw DNA Data.”
  9. Choose your Family Tree DNA™ Family Finder zip file.
  10. When the upload is complete, you will receive the message “DNA Data Upload Complete”.
*If you need assistance, please email [email protected]
23andMe Instructions
  1. Go to https://www.23andme.com/
  2. Click “Sign In” in the upper right hand corner.
  3. Enter your email address and password to access your account.
  4. Click your name/profile to the right of the navigation bar and select “Browse Raw Data” from the menu.
  5. Click “Download” at top right of the page.
  6. Review the raw data download and privacy content provided.
  7. Enter your Password and answer the Secret Question.
  8. Go to the “Profile:” box select your (name) data.
  9. Go to the “Dataset:” box and select “All DNA”.
  10. Click the “Download Data” box.
  11. Save the Zip file to your computer.
  12. Login to your GPS Origins™ account and click “Upload Raw DNA Data.”
  13. Choose your 23andMe zip file.
  14. When the upload is complete, you will receive the message “DNA Data Upload Complete”.
*If you need assistance, please email [email protected]
National Geographic™/The Genographic Project™/Geno 2.0™ Instructions
  1. Go to https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/
  2. Click “Sign In” in the upper right hand corner.
  3. Enter your username and password to access your account.
  4. Click your “Profile” from the blue menu.
  5. Select “Expert Options” from the gray menu.
  6. Review the privacy content provided.
  7. Click “Download.csv”.
  8. Save the file marked “Autosomal.csv” to your computer.
  9. Login to your GPS Origins™ account and click “Upload Raw DNA Data.”
  10. Choose the file marked "Autosomal.csv".
  11. When the upload is complete, you will receive the message “DNA Data Upload Complete”.
*If you need assistance, please email [email protected]
AncestryDNA™ Instructions
  1. Go to http://www.ancestry.com/
  2. Click “Sign In” in the upper right hand corner.
  3. Enter your email address and password to access your account.
  4. Click “DNA” from the main menu bar.
  5. Select “Your DNA Home Page”.
  6. Click “Manage Test Settings” to the right of the orange “View Results” box.
  7. Select “Get Started” in the right hand box under “Download our raw DNA data”.
  8. Enter your password and accept the privacy terms.
  9. Check your email and click the link provided to activate the download.
  10. Click the “Confirm Data Download”.
  11. Select “Download DNA Raw Data”.
  12. Save the Zip file to your computer.
  13. Login to your GPS Origins™ account and click “Upload Raw DNA Data.”
  14. Choose your AncestryDNA™ zip file.
  15. When the upload is complete, you will receive the message “DNA Data Upload Complete”.
*If you need assistance, please email [email protected]
GPS Origins™ Instructions
  1. Login to your GPS Origins™ account by entering your username and password.
  2. Click the gold + button to the left-hand side.
  3. Select “Upload Raw DNA Data” at the bottom.
  4. Save the Zip file to your computer.
  5. If you have any issues, please email [email protected]